Seven

I recently led a church hike to the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge (which is a wonderful place to take families, by the way). We had a group of kids that went with us, and two of the boys (my young son included) wanted desperately to go to the bookstore to do a little "shopping". They persistently pleaded their case, but I knew we needed to keep the group together and start the 5 mile hike.

So I did what any grown, mature adult would do: I pinky-promised them we would stop by after our hike. As we approached the visitor center on our return, I heard the unmistakable wailing of a disappointed six year old and instantly realized the bookstore had closed a few minutes before we got back.

But I pinky-promised.

The kids got over it (after I took them to a nearby diner for milkshakes all around), but it gave me food for thought as I started thinking about the seventh commandment: Do not commit adultery. We wrongly assume God's laws are about restriction, even going so far to say they are oppressive, but that couldn't be further from the truth. This commandment is all about the faithfulness of God and how he has created us to mirror himself in this world as his image-bearers.

For God, faithfulness is limitless -- God's covenant with us was established by God when he created the universe and made us to be his reflection on the earth, a covenant which was attacked by the Adversary and broken by us time and time again. But this covenant has been forever maintained by God and is fully restored and realized in Jesus (the New Covenant).

God is faithful. We are not.

We tend to treat our promises to God and to each other as though they were pinky promises, something we do at the moment to get what we want at that moment (in the same way I wanted to get the boys to start the hike). We break promises and covenant all the time, and everywhere we look, we see the human agony caused by our shattered covenant with God. So when God said to Israel, "Do not commit adultery", he was saying, "Be faithful, as I am faithful. Reflect who I am to each other."

The good news is we can comeback from our unfaithfulness. In fact, much of scripture's story describes our unfaithfulness, God's faithfulness, and us repenting and returning. We don't have to remain broken.

I feel like the whole history of humanity can be oddly summed up in this one command about fidelity: remain faithful.

Faithfulness is in the heart of God.